General Tutorials

Quilted Wrist Cuff {Step-by-Step Photo Tutorial}

After quickly making a quilted wrist cuff last week for the Project Quilting 15.5 prompt of Wearables, I slowed down this weekend and made a second version. While I made the second quilted wrist cuff, I made sure to take photos along the way so that I could put together this step-by-step photo tutorial. Trust me, these are quick and easy to assemble!

Quilted Wrist Cuff

Quilted Wrist Cuff

I have some ideas for other choices to consider to help make these as personalized as you desire, so let’s jump in!

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Fabric

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Fabric (Geometry – One Eighty – Citron)

Materials

  • Binding scrap or 2″-2½” x WOF strip of fabric (more on dialing in the exact length you will need based on your wrist diameter to follow)
  • Batting scrap
  • Thread
  • Sewing Machine
  • Non-adhesive Hook and Loop

Optional Materials

  • Chopstick or other blunt object to help press out turned corners
  • Another closure method (something other than non-adhesive hook and loop)
Quilted Wrist Cuff - Determining Length

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Determining Length

I cut a 2½” x WOF strip of Geometry – One Eighty – Citron for this example. To determine the length I needed, I folded the strip right sides together and then wrapped the double folded length around my right wrist and adjusted until I had a comfortable fit and the two ends overlapped by about 2″.

NOTE: The quilted wrist cuff I made for this tutorial with a 2½” strip finished at ~1½” wide using a ⅜” seam allowance. Adjust your seam allowance or strip width to get your desired finished width.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Determining Length

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Determining Length

Measuring it out, and comparing the length to my previously created quilted wrist cuff (noting that the extra length shown above is needed for seam allowances), I used a double folded length of 8½”. In the future, I now know that for my right wrist, I could use a 2½” x 17″ scrap.

TIP/IDEA: Consider using a different fabric on each side of the cuff to make the cuff double sided. Note that this tutorial uses a folded end on one side, so I would need to add an additional ¼”-⅜” to this length to account for a seam on each short end, so I would probably use two 2½” x 8¾” scraps.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Sew Around Perimeter, Leaving a 3" Gap

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Sew Around Perimeter, Leaving a 3″ Gap

After trimming to the needed length, I folded the strip right sides together in half along a short edge. Then I sewed around the perimeter, making sure to leave a 3″ gap along one long edge to allow the ability to turn the cuff right side out. I used a ⅜” seam allowance, and I made sure to backstitch at my starts and stops. Then I clipped the corners to make pushing out the corners after turning the cuff right side out a bit easier.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Measure for Batting Scrap Size

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Measure for Batting Scrap Size

Before prepping to turn the cuff right side out, I quickly measured to get an idea of the batting scrap size that I would need to cut to insert into the cuff. Because the white thread I used for the cuff is hard to see in the photo, I illustrated a red line on top of the seams. For this cuff, I cut an 8″ long by 1⅝” wide strip from a batting scrap.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Finger Press Fabric Prior to Turning Right Side Out

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Finger Press Fabric Prior to Turning Right Side Out

I find that it can be hard to get fabric nicely pressed to the seam line when turning something right side out, so to help with that (especially near the opening), I finger press the fabric back.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Insert Batting Scrap

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Insert Batting Scrap

After turning the cuff right side out, using a chopstick* to press out the corners, and giving the cuff a quick press, it’s time to insert the batting scrap through the opening. This is the step that takes the most patience. It is helpful to use the chopstick* to flatten the ends of the batting and make sure the corners are laying flat once you have worked it inside the cuff.

*Note you can use any other blunt object you might have on hand. I just like using what’s readily available to me, and I keep a chopstick in my sewing room for these kinds of project needs.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Topstitch to Secure Batting / Close Opening

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Topstitch to Secure Batting / Close Opening

After the batting is inserted, take the cuff back to the sewing machine to topstitch to secure the batting between the layers and close the opening.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Secure Topstitch Thread Tails

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Secure Topstitch Thread Tails

I like to pull the thread tails from my top stitching lines to the “back” side of the cuff, double knot the ends, and bury the tails between the layers. You can also choose to simply tie off and clip the ends, but since this is on the arm side of the cuff, I take the time to bury the thread tails so that the knots and ends do not rub on my skin.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Second Topstitching Pass

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Second Topstitching Pass

Because the first topstitching pass was meant to secure the batting in place, I opted to go back with a second topstitching pass, much closer to the edge, to fully enclose the opening used to turn the cuff right side out.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Quilt As Desired

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Quilt As Desired

After the topstitching is complete, add any additional quilting to the cuff that makes you happy. Since the cuff is so small, I opted to keep my regular piecing foot on and simply stitched a zig-zagging line from one side to the other following the stripes in the print and quilting on top of a previously stitched line to transition from one color stripe to the next.

I can imagine beautiful solid fabric wrist cuffs with signature free motion quilting motifs quilted into them!

TIP/IDEA: Stopping here, this would also make a really lovely quilted bookmark.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Testing Overlap for Hook/Loop Placement

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Testing Overlap for Hook/Loop Placement

Once the quilting is complete on the wrist cuff, it’s time to do the final fit check on your wrist to find your desired placement of the closure method. Since I use non-adhesive hook and loop, I use this fit check to get an idea of how large my overlap is so that I know how long I want to cut the hook and loop strips. In my case, this quilted wrist cuff overlaps by about 1½”, so I opted to cut 1″ strips from my hook and loop.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Positioning Hook

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Positioning Hook

When I’m wearing the quilted wrist cuff, I want to make sure that the hook side of the hook and loop is facing up and away from my skin. Based on the way I put on the quilted wrist cuff (which I will demonstrate at the end of this tutorial), that means I want to make sure the hook is on side that I’ve selected to be right side up for the cuff.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Hook Sewn in Place

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Hook Sewn in Place

When sewing the hook in place, I make sure to backstitch when I start and stop. The hook and loop that I am using have scant selvages, and I do my best to sew through those selvage edge sides, especially for the hook. I have found that even with non-adhesive hook, my needle and thread can get tangled in the hooks and fray and break if I try to sew perpendicular to these selvage sides.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Positioning Loop

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Positioning Loop

When positioning the loop, make sure it is on the opposite end of the hook and on the opposite side!

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Complete and Ready to Wear!

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Complete and Ready to Wear!

A good way to double check that the hook and loop are installed correctly is to fold the completed quilted wrist cuff in half. Both the hook and loop should be visible.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Wearing Step 1

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Wearing Step 1

To wear the quilted wrist cuff, I pinch the cuff between my arm and body, with the hook facing up toward my face (away from the skin of my wrist).

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Wearing Step 2

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Wearing Step 2

Using my opposite hand, I fold the loop end of the cuff up and press it onto the hook.

Quilted Wrist Cuff - Wear and Enjoy!

Quilted Wrist Cuff – Wear and Enjoy!

I then rotate the closure to be on the underside of my wrist, wear, and enjoy!

I would *love* to see what this tutorial inspires you to make. If you make a quilted wrist cuff, use the hashtag #QuiltedWristCuff and tag me @QuiltingJetgirl when you share on social media.

If you would like an easy to print version of this photo tutorial, I have a print friendly Quilted Wrist Cuff Photo Tutorial PDF available for $2 in my pattern shop.

Linking up with Tips and Tutorials on the 22nd.

10 thoughts on “Quilted Wrist Cuff {Step-by-Step Photo Tutorial}

  1. I love this project and it could be made fun in so many different ways. I hope you have created a new trend in the quilting world!

  2. Elizabeth says:

    Thank you for this tutorial. This wrist cuff would be a good way to cover up a Fitbit.

  3. Very fun. Perhaps you are a trend setter!

  4. patty says:

    Very fun. Perhaps you are a trend setter!

  5. Judy says:

    Love this idea! Will try adopt a pocket for bills and change!

  6. M. M. Mullins says:

    Shorter versions of these can be used to wrap around electrical cords to keep them tidy.
    (Handy when you’re taking an iron to a sewing retreat.)

  7. Julie Baumgras says:

    Nice idea! It would be fun to personalize them by embroidering names, initials, or little messages for the recipient. Thank you for this tutorial. I’m going to give it a try!

  8. What a wonderful tutorial. I love that it was inspired by the Project Quilting Wearables challenge and how quickly you turned it into something both beautiful and meaningful.

  9. LoAnn Trowbridge says:

    Cute ideal! Love the fabric you used!

I really appreciate the time and thought you take to comment, and I look forward to conversing with you. :)